Upcoming Events:

School Year 2017/2018

Tuesday 29th August 2017

Training of Peer Mentor       10:00am – 1:00pm

Staff Planning/Meetings       9:30am – 4:00pm

Wednesday, 30th August 2017

1st Year Students and Peer Mentors                 9:30am to 1:00pm

Parents/Guardians of 1st Years                          9:30am to 10:15am

Staff meet Parents                                                 9:30 am to 10:15am

Staff Planning                                                         10:15am to 4:00pm

Thursday 31st August 2017

School Year 2016/2017 Holidays

October Midterm Break: Close on Friday, 27th October 2017. Reopen on Monday, 6th November 2017.

Christmas Holidays: Close on Friday, 22nd December 2017. Reopen on Monday, 8th January 2018.

February Midterm Break: Close on Friday, 9h February 2018. Reopen on Monday, 19th February 2018.

St. Patrick’s Day Holiday: Closed on Monday 19th March 2018.

Easter Holidays: Close on Friday, 23rd March 2018. Reopen on Monday, 9th April 2018.

May Bank Holiday: Closed on Monday 7th May 2018.

Summer Holidays: Closing on Friday, 1st June 2018.

State Exams: Wednesday 6th June 2018

 

Click here to find out more

College News & Events

Physics

About
Physics describes the laws and forces that govern natural phenomena. This subject aims to enhance students ability to think logically, observe and understand scientific method. It offers a general education in physics for all students, enabling them to develop an understanding of the scientific method and their ability to observe, to think logically, and to communicate effectively. Science, technology and society (STS) is an integral part of the syllabus so that students can be aware of the principles of the applications of physics in the everyday world.

Why Study Physics?

Physics contributes to a student’s future career in many ways. It helps, in conjunction with the other Leaving Certificate subjects, to provide a broad, balanced education for any student. Physics teaches students to think logically and enables them to express their thoughts in a concise manner. The skills and knowledge developed through their study of physics can be useful in a wide variety of situations.

What kind of Student would Physics suit?

•  Students who wonder why and ask how

Students who are interested in the following careers would be advised to study Physics: Electrician, Optician, Doctor, Dentist, Engineer, Computer Technician and Programmer.

Recommendations/Tips
•  While there is an element of maths in the physics course, honours maths is not a requirement to do honours physics. Students should not avoid physics on the basis of not having honours maths. It is entirely possible to get on well in honours physics without honours maths.
•  Pupils should become able to draw and read graphs and be competent in using a calculator throughout the course. The physics syllabus has strong links with the other science subjects especially chemistry. There are strands of physics which overlap with woodwork and construction especially the electricity and heat sections.
•  Pupils who will gain the most from studying physics are those who have an interest in science at Junior Cert level and those who enjoy learning about how things work. The science, technology and society section allows students the chance to see where the physics they are learning applies as in TVs, car motors and electricity in the home and also, to see some of the industrial applications of certain topics.
•  For students who are interested in proceeding further with physics, check out our sector on Physical and Mathematical Sciences, and also the Institute of Physics, which provides information on the range of careers that students can follow after their study of physics at third level.

Course Overview
The Leaving Cert physics course follows directly from Junior Cert Science, and covers more topics in greater depth. Physics is often referred to as the maths side of science even though only a small proportion of the course is based on this. Physics aims to enhance student’s ability to think logically, observe and understand scientific method. The course is heavily based around experiments – students are required to complete and write reports of 24 practical experiments throughout the two years, and be fully aware of how to accurately record and analyse results, and how to minimise and accommodate for experimental errors. These laboratory experiments, along with many more non-compulsory experiments are examined in detail on a section of the written paper.

Course Content
The Physics course also involves a lot of theory which is tested in the written examination. Students are expected to be able to use various formulae with respect to SI units and significant figures, and have a good understanding of the role of physics in modern society and technology.

The study of Physics for Leaving Certificate is broken down into eight sections or topic areas:

(a) Six compulsory sections (b) Two option sections (Higher paper only, one to be done)

Compulsory sections
1. Optics / Waves: the study of light and sound and real life applications of the theory.
2. Mechanics: time, space, distance, speed and acceleration.
3. Heat: changes of state, energy conversions and mathematical problems.
4. Electricity: develops on from simple circuits to more detailed concepts.
5. Electricity and Magnetism: gravity, relationship between electricity and magnetism, study of how a motor works, ac. and dc. circuits and phenomena with real world applications.
6. Atomic Physics: cathode rays, x-rays, radioactive decay, fission and fusion, nuclear reactors and real world applications.

Option sections
1. Particle Physics: recent type of physics, delving into the new discoveries leading to a better understanding of the formation of the universe and where we came from.

2. Applied Electricity: detailed study of electricity and the working of a motor developing from electricity already studied.

At Higher Level, there is a deeper, more quantitative treatment of physics. The two option sections are omitted from the Ordinary Level Leaving Certificate course.

The course also consists of 24 core mandatory experiments complementing each section in an aim to develop students’ technical skills and enhance understanding and reinforce key concepts.

Exam Structure

The leaving cert exam is three hours in duration. Total of 400 marks for the exam.

Section A:
•Students must answer 3 out of 4 questions
•120 marks: 40 marks per question
•Questions are based on experimental procedures and use of results

Section B:
•Students must answer 5 out of 8 questions
•280 marks: 56 marks per question
•Questions are more broad and theory based

There is no element of continuous assessment but experimental copies must be available for inspection by the State Examinations Commission. Students taking chemistry have to memorize the chemical components of a series of prescribed experiments. They will need to present the elements of four such experiments in their exam.

Leaving Certificate Physics is assessed by means of one terminal examination paper at each level. Students are required to keep a record of their practical work over the two years of the course.

Career Possibilities
Physics is a useful subject for many courses and careers and a good foundation for a broad range of scientific and technical careers. Many careers benefit from the logical and numeracy skills developed by the study of physics. Many technical courses involve components of physics.



Back to top